Saturday, February 26, 2011

Meatloaf: Slow Cookin’ for Two

On this quiet balmy Saturday in Prospect Heights, I finally planed, scraped, and painted the hallway doors a soft Naples Yellow while Steph was out. Why would anyone use sand paint on a door? These doors now look less like a David Lean prop from Great Expectations. Meanwhile in the news the Middle East has been in turmoil. Egyptians have overthrown their regime. Libya has followed suit as is much of the Middle East. Social media lead their revolution. In the U.S. social media is more often used by an anonymous person to girl-bully another, i.e. Sarah Palin's online ghost writer Rebecca Mansour circa the "bullseye map" incident.

Here in the U.S., economic unrest is becoming more apparent as we trudge through an unpunctual economic recovery and growing unemployment and inflation. Gasoline is said to go up to $5.00 per gallon. Are we now headed into the revolution with out a car? The only thing good about slow going is a slowly cooked meal. I made a meatloaf dinner in my Crock Pot — slow going but always moist and delicious with little effort. I used beef, pork, veal, bell pepper, onion, garlic, celery, basil, fresh parsley, ketchup, bread crumbs... practically everything in the fridge. My Parmesan & chive mashed potatoes were actually more work than the meatloaf.

To get my slow cooker meatloaf recipe visit GardenFork.tv. I think everyone can figure out how to make Parmesan & chive mashed potatoes.


GardenFork.tv was created by my friend Eric Rochow, a social media guru who advocates greener living in New York. GardenFork.tv is a how-to blog that features podcast commentaries, video interviews, DIY projects, cooking segments, and original recipes. I'm a regular content contributor. Eric and I often explore Brooklyn neighborhoods and promote the fine local fare, and to reconnect with a more human way of living.

...oh, and shortly before dinner our neighbor Justine D. brought over her delicious brown-butter carrot cake with lemon cream cheese icing for dessert — she's quite the chef. Brooklyn revolves with the flavor of life.

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